5 Rules For How to Get Your Toddler to Sleep Alone

All you need is one full night of sleep, right?

Your toddler’s inability to sleep on their own is now becoming a drag. Lack of sleep, and dare I say a reduced chance of ‘mommy and daddy time’ is beginning to take its toll on your life.

If this is you, then you must be desperate to know how to get your toddler to sleep alone! I’ve been there, and in this post, I will give you some tips for overcoming this issue.


Reasons Why Your Toddler Does Not Want To Sleep Alone

why do toddlers not like sleeping on their own

Toddlers should be able to fall asleep on their own and alone. The reason why most toddlers develop a chronic pattern of dependency is due to how their parents respond during those anxious nights that happen here and there.

Naturally, our children should develop the capacity to master their fears and soothe themselves.

Despite this, some toddlers are just afraid to sleep alone, even after reassuring words and checking under the beds. So, why is this happening?


Transitioning to Toddler Bed

Toddlers may go through a stage where they realize their separation from mommy or daddy and the fact that they need to sleep on their own. This usually happens when a toddler is transitioning to a bigger bed.

As they learn to push boundaries, they will go through phases of not wanting to be alone.

As a result, they may want to climb out of their beds and seek proximity or closeness to their parents at night.


Negative Sleep Associations

Between the age of 2 and 5 years, imagination begins to develop in a toddler’s mind in earnest.

At this stage, magical thinking and things such as fears and nightmares or night terrors start to emerge and may be challenging for parents who are looking for ways on how to toddler to sleep alone.

Since the toddler is not able to separate imagination from reality, they may become very unsettled hence resist sleeping alone.


Anxieties

Toddlers feel safe when close to those they love and tend to cling around all the time. Clinging happens especially in times of stress of uncertainties that result in bedtime fears.

When fear develops, it’s natural to find them needing comfort from those they are attached to, like parents or babysitters. It mostly develops in toddlers who get separated from their parents during the day.


Unhealthy Habits

Some parents are not aware that the bedtime habits they allow or encourage can lead to sleep problems on their children.

It becomes challenging to make changes later once these habits have developed. Though not impossible, it’s worth making an effort.

It will be easier for a toddler and parents if ground sleeping rules and routines are set earlier to avoid problems later.


Bedtime Resistance

Mostly, toddlers above two years may refuse to go to bed and sleep while watching TV with their parents.

A mild resistance of bedtime refusal is when a toddler delays his bedtime with open-ended questions, unreasonable requests, crying, protests, and temper.

These are unjustified attempts to test their parent’s good nature and limits, and not necessarily bedtime fears.


How You Can Encourage Your Toddler to Sleep Alone

How Can You Encourage Your Toddler to Sleep Alone Infographic

Getting a toddler to sleep alone is enough of a circus, and you need to figure out how you are going to tackle bedtime.

If your toddler is struggling to sleep alone, some decisions may help to cope with the situation, which comes with some challenges.

First things first, you need to be firm and tell your toddler why they need to stay in their bed and sleep.

Once a parent has set that expectation, it’s time to apply some bedtime routines on how to get a toddler to sleep alone. Some tips may help.


Communicate Effectively

When a toddler is feeling insecure, he will tend to cry as you are leaving the room. You can verbally reassure him that you are going to tend to something, and he must stay in bed. If he gets out of bed, take him back to his bed and physically put him back in.

Do this without arguing or talking. He will get to the point that it’s time to sleep, and you mean business. Most likely, a toddler may want to test you, so keep taking him back and back again until he stays.


Remain Persistent But Be Calm

If your toddler follows you, try sitting on a chair in the room. Reassure him of your presence by sitting close to his bed. Tell him you are going to sit right there, only once, and no more talking!

Don’t get into his bed or allow him to be out of bed or sit in your lap. When he is asleep, leave the room.


How to Deal With Crying

The toddler stage is full of emotions, and some days can be full of all the extremes of emotional response a toddler can have.

Many of their roller coaster ride experiences are groundless and unjustified. As you try to break the unhealthy sleep associations, your child may cry, be present, and responsive.

Your presence as he sleeps shows you are responding but teach him how to cope with difficult emotional situations. Show him even if he cries, the fact will not change.


Have a Daytime Talk

As you are helping your toddler to cope with the difficult task of sleeping alone and becoming more independent, create some time during the day and talk about it with him. Show him some love and express how proud you are of him that he can now sleep on his own.

Take time to listen to your toddler and remark on his progress.


Teach Your Toddler to Self-Soothe

Self-soothing is an art that a toddler can learn through some self-made strategies to soothe themselves to sleep. It involves useful, yet straightforward self-managed tools like sucking a dummy or a toy, swaddling, or self-exploration.

You can also use soothing strategies like a light projector to settle your toddler.


FAQs

faqs for toddlers who do not sleep on their own
How do I get my toddler to sleep in his bed after co-sleeping?

You could start by keeping him at arm’s length if he used to be a bedside sleeper. Then bring a crib for him in your room instead of putting him in his place from the get-go. After a few days, help your toddler transit to his room.

Is it OK for a child to sleep with his parents?

It’s a personal choice. For infants, not only are parents close by to respond if something goes wrong, it easier for the breastfeeding mom to nurse throughout the night. But, as toddlers develop, it becomes more problematic as they may develop unhealthy parental fixation and also their presence may hinder marital intimacy, jeopardizing a marriage.

What age should a child sleep in their own room?

Children should sleep in the same room as their parents for the first six months up to one year.


Conclusion

Parents may get a night of good sleep when their toddler is in another room, but toddlers may only feel safe in the presence of a parent. But, the good thing is that falling asleep is a habit, and children can learn it.

While some may have some difficulties falling asleep than others, all children eventually start to learn how to fall asleep without the presence of their parents.

It may take some time to learn the habit, but children will finally learn to put themselves into sleep on their own eventually.

Good luck!

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